Project Guides

EDRM Jobs Guide

EDRM Jobs Guide with six phases: Needs Assessment; Jub Benchmarking; Talent Acquisition Strategy; Interviewing & Selection; On-Board Training; and Ongoing Retention.

EDRM Search Guide

During the discovery phase of litigation, parties to a dispute must take appropriate, reasonable steps to locate relevant, responsive Electronically Stored Information (“”) in response to discovery requests. This EDRM Search Guide focuses on the search, retrieval and production of within the larger e-discovery process described in the EDRM Model. Use of automated search can be an essential component in the e-discovery process as attorneys may perform automated searches to locate relevant, responsive, and/or privileged for a legal matter. The commentary in this EDRM Search Guide describes the concept of search, the various search methodologies available to a practitioner in a particular case, and how various search methods may be deployed to achieve the most optimal results.

Statistical Sampling, Release 2

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance regarding the use of statistical sampling in e-discovery contexts. This is an update/enhancement of material that was originally developed and posted on the EDRM website in 2012.

E-discovery participants recognize that, when used appropriately, statistical sampling can optimize resources and improve quality. However, an ongoing educational challenge is to meet the needs of two audiences within the e-discovery community.

  • Those who wish to improve their awareness of, and confidence in, these techniques without delving deeply into the technical math.
  • Those whose e-discovery roles and responsibilities do require that they learn and understand the technical math.

Therefore, some of the material is covered twice. The earlier material is definitional and conceptual, and is intended for a broad audience. The later material and the accompanying spreadsheet provide additional, more technical information, to people in e-discovery roles who become responsible for developing further expertise.

  • Electronically Stored Information or ESI is information that is stored electronically on enumerable types of media regardless of the original format in which it was created.
  • Electronically Stored Information: this is an all inclusive term referring to conventional electronic documents (e.g. spreadsheets and word processing documents) and in addition the contents of databases, mobile phone messages, digital recordings (e.g. of voicemail) and transcripts of instant messages. All of this material needs to be considered for disclosure.
  • Electronically Stored Information or ESI is information that is stored electronically on enumerable types of media regardless of the original format in which it was created.
  • Electronically Stored Information: this is an all inclusive term referring to conventional electronic documents (e.g. spreadsheets and word processing documents) and in addition the contents of databases, mobile phone messages, digital recordings (e.g. of voicemail) and transcripts of instant messages. All of this material needs to be considered for disclosure.
  • Electronically Stored Information or ESI is information that is stored electronically on enumerable types of media regardless of the original format in which it was created.
  • Electronically Stored Information: this is an all inclusive term referring to conventional electronic documents (e.g. spreadsheets and word processing documents) and in addition the contents of databases, mobile phone messages, digital recordings (e.g. of voicemail) and transcripts of instant messages. All of this material needs to be considered for disclosure.